Jim Clark

Dallas County Sheriff Jim Clark (facing the camera) led efforts by Selma law enforcement to keep Black citizens from voting in the days leading up to the Selma-to-Montgomery March.

Courtesy of the Birmingham News. All rights reserved. Used with permission.
Jim Clark

Bloody Sunday

State troopers and sheriff's deputies attack demonstrators on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma on March 7, 1965, during the Selma to Montgomery March. The day quickly came to be known as "Bloody Sunday."

Courtesy of the Birmingham News. All rights reserved. Used with permission.
Bloody Sunday

Tear Gas

State troopers and sheriff's deputies tear gassed demonstrators on May 7, 1965, during the Selma to Montgomery march. The day would later be named "Bloody Sunday."

Courtesy of the Birmingham News. All rights reserved. Used with permission.
Tear Gas

Surrounded by Police

These demonstrators were surrounded by Montgomery police at the state capitol as the Selma to Montgomery march ended in March 1965.

Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History
Surrounded by Police

Marchers Resting

Selma to Montgomery marchers covered the approximately 50 miles between the two cities in four days, resting in fields along the side of the road.

Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History
Marchers Resting

Marchers Along U.S. Highway 80

The number of participants in the Selma to Montgomery march decreased as the march travelled along this rural two-lane stretch of U.S. Highway 80 in Lowndes County, but they increased as the demonstrators neared Montgomery.

Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History
Marchers Along U.S. Highway 80

At the Capitol

More than 20,000 demonstrators arrived at the Capitol in Montgomery on March 25, 1965, concluding the Selma to Montgomery march.

Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History
At the Capitol

Marchers in Selma

Some of the 8,000 participants in the Selma to Montgomery march stride through the streets of Selma on their way to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History
Marchers in Selma

Joan Baez and Unnamed Marcher

Musician and political activist Joan Baez speaks with a fellow participant during Selma to Montgomery march in March 1965. Baez was one of many celebrities who traveled to Montgomery to lend their support to the civil rights effort.

Courtesy of the Alabama Department of Archives and History
Joan Baez and Unnamed Marcher

Harlem March

Roughly 15,000 marchers paraded in Harlem, New York, on March 15, 1965, to support voting rights and civil rights efforts in Alabama.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress
Harlem March